Penn State Media Sales / Political/Social Sciences

Political/Social Sciences DVDs Offered by Penn State Media Sales

Diversity Issues in the Classroom

Consists of 4 case studies, each dealing with a specific aspect of diversity in the class room. Short dramatic vignettes are followed by panel discussions. Each segment is open-ended to facilitate live discussion. A. Confronting Overt Racism - Addresses the question of what an instructor's responsibility is when confronted with overt racism in his or her classroom. B. Gender Bias - A female student is constantly overlooked in class by her professor. C. Diversity as Subject Matter - Women's Studies instructor loses control of class as the legitimacy of her discipline is called into question. D. Instructor with Language Bias - Instructor insists Latino student has problem with English.Produced by Penn State Off ice of Educational Equity, the Penn State Affirmative Action Office, and WPSX-TV

Responding to Genocide Find out how to save Darfur. LeeAnn DeReus

HOME USE ONLY Lee Ann De Reus discusses the history of genocide and what can be done to stop the atrocities happening in the world today. Lee Ann De Reus is associate professor of human development & family studies and women's studies at Penn State Altoona. In 2007 De Reus traveled to a Sudanese refugee camp in Chad where she spoke with 25 Darfuri women-genocide survivors. She now lectures extensively about genocide and is the co-founder of Save Darfur: Central PA. In 2008 she was the recipient of the first-ever Penn State University Spirit of Internationalization Award given in honor of her commitment to global service and outreach. Most recently the Genocide Intervention Network awarded her the Carl Wilken's Fellowship; an honor given to 20 people throughout the country dedicated to ending genocide.

The Kirghiz of Afghanistan - Disappearing World

Describes the life of the Kirghiz, a culture native to a remote corner of Afghanistan and unchanged since the Middle Ages. Survival depended completely on the favor of the Khans, feudal lords who claimed descent from the legendary Genghis Khan. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Nazif Shahrani. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Breaking the Silence: The Generation After the Holocaust

A documentary about the impact on young adults of growing up with parents who are survivors of the Holocaust. Focuses on members of a second-generation group who discuss their concerns and the need to communicate with their parents about them. Dr. Edward A. Mason, Eva Fogelman, and Henry Grunebaum. Blue Ribbon winner, American Film Festival.

Cakchiquel Maya of San Antonio Palopo - Disappearing World

The Tunecos of San Antonio Palopo speak Cakchiquel, one of more than twenty Mayan languages still extant in Guatemala. As development encroaches, these people must decide whether the loss of their culture is too high a price to pay for incorporation into the world beyond their lakeside village. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Tracy Bachrach Ehlers. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Diversity Issues in Higher Education

Five case studies are depicted, each dealing with a different aspect of diversity in higher education. Short dramatic vignettes are followed by panel discussions. Each segment is open ended to facilitate live discussion. A. International Student Issues - International Teaching Assistants discuss the American classroom climate from their perspective. B. Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Issues - New lesbian faculty member, who is not out publicly, encounters overt hostility from senior faculty member in her department and seeks guidance. C. Learning Disability Issues - Learning disabled student seeks accommodation from a not so cooperative faculty member. D. Adult Learner Issues - Adult veteran asserts his world experience in the classroom leading to conflict with the instructor. E. Issues in Multicultural Education - Two faculty members with opposing points of view discuss the veracity of multiculturalism and diversity over lunch.Produced by Penn State Off ice of Educational Equity, the Penn State Affirmative Action Office, and WPSX-TV

The Pathans - Disappearing World

Bound by a common language, heritage, and religion, the Pathans do not acknowledge the geographical boundary between Pakistan and Afghanistan that divides their people. Their code of conduct is based on personal honor and revenge, and they accept no imposed leadership -- as the Soviet invaders of Afghanistan discovered. From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologist: Akbar Ahmed. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken. A limited supply of VHS tapes. Final sale only.

Rising Waters

A critical look into the perennial stuggle of man vs. nature as flood damaged communites are forced to come to terms with the dangers of living in the flood plain. Written, directed, & produced by Andrew Jones 2002

A Few Good Women Recruiting Women to Government

CLASSROOM, LIBRARY RIGHTS In 1969, the Nixon administration launched a little-known initiative to recruit women to government. President Nixon's then staff assistant, Barbara Franklin, led the effort. She talks about the project and the special collection of oral histories that document it. Barbara Franklin is President and Chief Executive Officer of Barbara Franklin Enterprises, a private investment and consulting firm headquartered in Washington, DC. Franklin served as the 29th U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. She has directed fourteen public companies and is currently a director of two. She received the prestigious John J. McCloy award in 1992 for her outstanding contributions to audit excellence. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Mind Wars Jonathan Moreno

HOME USE RIGHTS Mind Wars Jonathan Moreno Super soldiers equipped with neural implants, suits that contain biosensors, and thought scans of detainees may become reality sooner than you think. Find out how neuroscience is changing modern warfare, and discover the ethical implications with guest Jonathan Moreno. Jonathan Moreno began his career as a medical ethicist and is now internationally recognized as a leading expert on ethics related to neuroscience and national security. Moreno is David and Lyn Silfen professor and professor of medical ethics and the history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania and was formerly the director of the Center for Ethics at the University of Virginia. He has served as senior staff member for two presidential commissions and is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Race and Immigrationon Victor Romero

HOME USE Victor Romero, Philippines native, teaches and writes about immigrant and minority rights at Penn State. He joined the faculty in 1995 after working in private practice and as a law clerk to a federal judge in California. An elected member of the American Law Institute (ALI), Romero is co-editor of the anthology, Immigration and the Constitution, and author of Alienated: Immigrant Rights, the Constitution, and Equality in America. Romero has served as president of both the South Central Pennsylvania Chapter of the ACLU and the NAACP of the Greater Carlisle Area. He was also a visiting professor of law at Howard and at Rutgers-Camden. Most recently, Romero served as the associate dean for Academic Affairs at University Park during academic years 2006-07 and 2007-08. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Terrorism and Fear: Helping Students Understand

Terrorism occurs all over the world. Understand what terrorism is and see how terrorists operate. Strategies for how to cope after terrorists have acted are given in a video that sheds light on systematic, organized violence.

Coming of Age: Adult Bat Mitzvah

Explores the experiences of a group of thirteen women aged thirty-two to eighty-two who participated in an adult bat mitzvah at Temple Beth Abraham in Oakland, California. Interviews with six of the women reveal the varied and compelling reasons for seeking in their adult years this ceremonial recognition, which traditionally marks the religious coming of age for thirteen-year-old Jewish girls. Produced by Bonnie Burt.

Gay and Lesbian Lifestyles

Examines the difficulties of homosexuals in gaining acceptance from relatives, people in the community, and on the university campus. Discusses a variety of issues and problems, including the realization of one's homosexuality, coming out to family and friends, relationships with relatives and heterosexuals, and homophobia. Three students talk about their experiences with these situations. Produced by Kurt P. Dudt.

A Love Canal Family

The death of their son and the discovery that their Love Canal neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York, was sitting atop one of the nation's largest chemical dumping grounds shattered the lives of the Kenny family. The program documents Jon Kenny's illness and death, the conflicting opinions of health professionals about the cause, and the radicalization of parents who believe their son died of exposure to chemical waste. Produced by WMHT, Schenectady, and WNED, Buffalo, for the U.S. Chronicle series.

Act Against Violence: Response to Hate Groups

Floyd Cochran speaks about racism. Discussion focuses on how communities can respond to and organize against hate groups. C1995

The Penn State Diversity Series (Four Videos)

Produced by Penn State Office of Educational Equity, the Penn State Affirmative Action Office, and WPSU-TV includes: Diversity Issues in the Classroom, Diversity Issues in Higher Education, OUTlook and Sexual Harrassment: A New Look at an Old Problem. (Diversity Issues)

Adjusting to the Challenges of Boarding School

In a classroom setting, boarding students and an instructor examine problems inherent in young adolescents' transition from home to boarding school: dealing with homesickness, making new friends, and coping with rigorous academic demands. The instructor demonstrates specific cognitive tools that new boarding students can use to minimize the stress and anxiety associated with this difficult adjustment period. Produced by David L. Gleason.

American Marathon: Running for the White House

Correspondent Judy Woodruff and two teen-age "co-anchors" explain to young people the presidential electoral process. Looks at election rules and methods, including balloting, primary, and electoral college procedures, as well as such kinds of campaign activity as image making and techniques designed to appeal to specific segments of the voting public. Directed by Bill Masullo and produced by Tim Swartz for Penn State Television / WPSX-TV.

Big Problems for Little People

Discusses the relationships among poverty, malnutrition, environment, and sociocultural factors relevant to human growth and development as documented by cases in the rural Philippines. Produced by George M. and Helen A. Guthrie of Penn State University.

Labor - Management Relations in Steel: Conflict or Cooperation

1984 WPSX

Company Town

C 1979 A small, company-owned town in Oregon is severely affected by the shutdown of the local lumber mill. Details the search for alternatives by the town's citizenry, including solicitation of government funding and an attempt to purchase the mill and operate it as a cooperative. Illustrates the obstacles encountered in mobilizing a community-action group. Also shows the dehumanizing effects and frustrations that occur when individuals must deal with a complex economic system and a faceless corporate entity. Directed and produced by Kris Jensen and Sharon Genasci.

Quest for Peace: Alexander Dallin

Alexander Dallin, chairman of the Department of International Relations at Stanford University, points out the misperceptions and fallacies that each superpower holds about the actions and intentions of the other, and observes that both the United States and the Soviet Union need to once again start to develop policies for working with one another.

Quest for Peace: Alton Frye

Alton Frye, Washington director and senior fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations, identifies the intrinsic value of arms control and the negotiating process, and addresses possible directions the Soviet Union and the United States could find to be in their national interests.

Quest for Peace: Barry M. Goldwater

Barry M. Goldwater, former chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, explains the centrality of freedom to humankind and the relationship of freedom to peace, outlines the basis of U.S. national security, and shares his insights into relating with the Soviet Union in modern times.

Quest for Peace: Betty Reardon

Betty Reardon, coordinator of the Peace Education Program at Columbia University Teachers College, discusses militarism and sexism as the social values that predispose societies toward war, and expresses what she believes religion and education can contribute to the task of making the planet more secure.

Quest for Peace: Brian M. Jenkins

Brian M. Jenkins, former member of the Green Berets and the 5th Special Forces Group in Vietnam, defines terrorism, describes the six basic tactics terrorists use, and indicates how terrorism will fit into the future of armed conflict.

Quest for Peace: Clark M. Clifford

Clark M. Clifford, former U.S. secretary of defense, talks about the control and reduction of nuclear weapons to increase global security, states that history shows that genuine peace is not achieved through an arms build-up, and maintains that to be considered successful, any U.S. president must establish a positive relationship with the Soviet Union.

Quest for Peace: Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice, assistant director of the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, explores the role of the Soviet military in shaping the policies of the Soviet Union and addresses issues that have affected U.S.-Soviet arms control negotiations.

Quest for Peace: Curtis E. Le May

Retired General Curtis E. Le May, former U.S. Air Force chief of staff, advocates the preservation of peace through military strength and states his opinion that an arms race is preferable to a shooting war, but that if military force is to be used, it should be done quickly and powerfully with a goal of achieving a fast, overwhelming victory.

Quest for Peace: David Holloway

David Holloway, senior research associate in the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University, identifies the central themes in Soviet thinking about crisis and security and about how a nuclear war might begin, explains why the Strategic Defense Initiative brings such an intense reaction from the Soviet Union, and reflects on what is different about the new Soviet leadership.

Quest for Peace: Desmond Ball

Desmond Ball, head of the Strategic and Defense Studies Centre of the Australian National University, indicates that the United States and the Soviet Union have fundamentally different policies on the use of nuclear weapons, resulting in contradictions and misperceptions that could lead to a nuclear exchange, and describes superpower doctrines concerning deterrence and the use of nuclear weapons.

Quest for Peace: Donald McHenry

Donald McHenry, Georgetown University professor and former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, explores the Soviet-American relationship and the United States' obsession with military security, and states that a major goal of U.S. policy toward theSoviet Union should be to open channels of communication for successful negotiations.

Quest for Peace: Edward Teller

Edward Teller of Stanford University, principal creator of the hydrogen bomb and presidential adviser on the Strategic Defense Initiative, discusses technology as a force for peace and security, presents the parallels in the controversy over the hydrogen bomb and the controversy over the SDI, then indicates why proceeding with SDI is in the national interest and why the Soviet Union is so opposed to it.

Quest for Peace: Elise Boulding

Elise Boulding, Dartmouth College professor emerita of sociology, offers a vision of a world where people manage conflict intelligently and peacefully without military force, calls for a new international order to deal with conflict by nonmilitary means, and draws attention to the importance of nongovernmental organizations in creating the framework for peace.

Quest for Peace: Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr.

Retired Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., former chief of naval operations, states that the Soviet Union remains an aggressive nation bent on world domination and indicates that the United States must work to eliminate the Soviet military advantage by increasing defense spending, modernizing the armed forces, and pursuing the Strategic Defense Initiative.

Quest for Peace: Franklin A. Long

Franklin A. Long, professor emeritus of science and society at Cornell University, discusses potential opportunities for enhancing world peace and security, analyzes the arms control initiatives of the Reykjavik summit, identifies U.S. and Soviet weapons-in-space programs, and suggests that U.S. unilateral arms control initiatives would enhance security.

Quest for Peace: George Keyworth

George Keyworth, science adviser to President Ronald Reagan, describes the former president's vision for a more peaceful world through the Strategic Defense Initiative, explains why strategic defense and the use of technology can be a significant force for peace, and discusses how emerging technologies can affect long-term planning.

Quest for Peace: Georgi Arbatov

Georgi Arbatov, director of the Institute of the USA and Canada Studies at the Soviet Academy of Sciences and member of the Soviet Central Committee of the Communist Party, discusses the consequences of achieving a new U.S.-Soviet relationship and urges the United States to recognize that the age of empires is past.

Quest for Peace: Gerard C. Smith

Gerard C. Smith, chief U.S. delegate to the first Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty talks, analyzes the process of negotiating with the Soviet Union in arms control agreements, explores the relationship of summit meetings to arms control negotiations,explains what can be done when results are elusive, and identifies the need for an irreversible process of arms control negotiations.

Quest for Peace: Gloria Duffy

Gloria Duffy, president of Global Outlook, describes how Soviet and American compliance with existing treaties influences the process of entering into new treaties, questions whether having Soviet on-site inspection of American facilities will undermine U.S. security, and indicates what the compliance problems will be.

Quest for Peace: Hans Bethe

Hans Bethe of Cornell University, a Nobel laureate in physics, discusses the impotence of political mechanisms in the face of new technological developments, applies the laws of physics to the new technology associated with strategic defense, and questions whether new technology can re-create a world environment that existed prior to the first atomic bomb.

Quest for Peace: Helmut Sonnenfeldt

Former senior staff member of the National Security Council, Helmut Sonnenfeldt discusses the international negotiating behavior of the Soviet Union and the role of U.S. weapons systems and defense policies in influencing that behavior, and points outthat agreements between the superpowers work fairly well when the subject matter is specific.

Quest for Peace: Henry S. Rowen

Henry S. Rowen, professor of public management at Stanford University, discusses the balance of power between the Soviet Union and the United States, describes how the Soviets have used arms control agreements to neutralize U.S. forces, and states that no U.S. objective related to the balance of nuclear forces can be obtained through arms control.

Quest for Peace: Herbert York

Herbert York, director of the University of California Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, discusses nuclear defense and the militarization of space, and traces the history of how the United States and the Soviet Union have approached the problem of defense in the nuclear age.

Quest for Peace: J. William Fulbright

J. William Fulbright, former chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, explores the "limits of the possible" in the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union, details what the United States can do to influence the Soviet Union, and explains why detente is in the best interests of both superpowers.

Quest for Peace: Jerome B. Wiesner

Jerome B. Wiesner, president emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and special assistant to President John F. Kennedy, discusses the importance of an informed citizenry in the construction of an enduring peace.

Quest for Peace: Paul H. Nitze

Former Secretary of the Navy Paul H. Nitze, special representative for arms control and disarmament negotiations for President Ronald Reagan, discusses strategic insights toward a more peaceful world and offers a transition plan for strategic forces resulting in a mixture of offense and defense.

Quest for Peace: Randall Forsberg

Randall Forsberg, president and director of the Institute for Defense and Disarmament Studies, discusses the problems of overcoming obstacles to a stable disarmed peace and explains the "no first use" of nuclear weapons and the bilateral nuclear freezeas complementary concepts.

Quest for Peace: Richard Falk

Richard Falk, professor of international law at Princeton University, discusses the revival of political democracy as a move toward a just world order and offers an assessment of U.S. foreign policy since World War II as it pertains to the prevention of a third world war.

Quest for Peace: Roald Sagdeev

Roald Sagdeev, director of the Space Research Institute of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, offers his nation's perspective on technology and security, and suggests what is possible with respect to verification of compliance with U.S.-Soviet agreements.

Quest for Peace: Robert C. Tucker

Robert C. Tucker, professor emeritus of international studies and former director of the Russian Studies Program at Princeton University, discusses the mutual security interests of the United States and the Soviet Union, and explains why it is not in the interests of either side to feel threatened.

Quest for Peace: Robert Muller

U.N. Assistant Secretary General Robert Muller, a French Resistance fighter during World War II, identifies areas where the United States and the Soviet Union can work together to advance the cause of peace, and reviews the accomplishments of the United Nations toward world peace.

Quest for Peace: Robert S. McNamara, 1

Secretary of defense for presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, Robert S. McNamara reviews changed circumstances affecting security in the United States and the world, and urges both the adoption of a policy of sustained communication withthe Soviet Union and a shift in the U.S. approach to the developing countries of the world.

Quest for Peace: Robert S. McNamara, 2

In the second part of the Robert S. McNamara interview, he explains the choices that must be made between meaningful arms control and strategic defense, and advocates reducing the superpowers' arsenals and revising doctrines associated with nuclear weapons.

Quest for Peace: Robert S. McNamara, 3

In the final portion of the Robert S. McNamara interview, the former secretary talks about surviving the first century of the nuclear age.

Quest for Peace: Roger Molander

Roger Molander, member of the National Security Council under former presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Jimmy Carter, discusses nuclear proliferation and five forums in which action can be taken to restrict the spread of nuclear weapons.

Quest for Peace: Sergei Kaptiza

Professor of physics at the Soviet Academy of Sciences and vice chairman of the Committee of Soviet Scientists for Peace Against the Nuclear Threat, Sergei Kaptiza discusses a second "Russian Revolution," citing evidence from history where new thinkinghas led to improvements in world conditions.

Colin Powell

As a member of the U.S. Army, Colin Powell was awarded the Presidential Medal of Honor and became highly recognized. He was the first African-American chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He was Reagan's National Security Advisor and he is now the Secretary of State for the Bush administration. Learn about his life and career. ©2002

America's Role in the World - Ambassador Richard Butler,

HOME USE RIGHTS Find out why a world without nuclear weapons is vital America's Role in the World with Ambassador Richard Butler. Is it really possible to eliminate nuclear weapons? And what will it take to renew U.S. foreign policy? Ambassador Richard Butler, one of the leading experts with respect to nuclear arms control and disarmament, tackles these questions and more.Ambassador Richard Butler is distinguished scholar for international peace and security at Penn State's School of International Affairs. He is a recognized expert in nuclear arms control and disarmament and served as the United Nations' chief arms inspector of Iraq between 1997 and 1999. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

America's Role in the World - Ambassador Richard Butler,

CLASSROOM LIBRARY RIGHTS Find out why a world without nuclear weapons is vital America's Role in the World with Ambassador Richard Butler,. in Is it really possible to eliminate nuclear weapons? And what will it take to renew U.S. foreign policy? Ambassador Richard Butler, one of the leading experts with respect to nuclear arms control and disarmament, tackles these questions and more.Ambassador Richard Butler is distinguished scholar for international peace and security at Penn State's School of International Affairs. He is a recognized expert in nuclear arms control and disarmament and served as the United Nations' chief arms inspector of Iraq between 1997 and 1999. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

The Black Middle Class with Mary Pattillo

CLASSROOM LIBRARY RIGHTS Uncover the experiences of middle class African Americans in The Black Middle Calss with Mary Pattillo Mary Pattillo discusses the rarely studied and often overlooked African American middle class. Discover the history of the black middle class, learn about conflicts between middle class and poor African Americans, and find out how the election of President Obama has altered the dialogue. Mary Pattillo is one of the leading sociologists on race and class in the 21st century. She is professor of sociology and African American studies at Northwestern University and author of "Black Picket Fences," which takes a candid look at the rarely studied black middle class. Mary Pattillo discusses the rarely studied and often overlooked African American middle class. Discover the history of the black middle class, learn about conflicts between middle class and poor African Americans, and find out how the election of President Obama has altered the dialogue. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Khyber Pass - Disappearing World

The Pakistani army now patrols the Khyber Pass region, where 17,000 British soldiers, women, and children were massacred by the Pathans in 1842, and there is still constant conflict with Pathans who live on the border between Pakistan and Afghanistan.From the Disappearing World series. Anthropologists: Akbar Ahmed and Louis Dupree. English subtitles are used when local dialects are spoken.

Responding to Genocide Find out how to save Darfur. LeeAnn DeReus

CLASSROOM RIGHTS ONLY Lee Ann De Reus discusses the history of genocide and what can be done to stop the atrocities happening in the world today. Lee Ann De Reus is associate professor of human development & family studies and women's studies at Penn State Altoona. In 2007 De Reus traveled to a Sudanese refugee camp in Chad where she spoke with 25 Darfuri women-genocide survivors. She now lectures extensively about genocide and is the co-founder of Save Darfur: Central PA. In 2008 she was the recipient of the first-ever Penn State University Spirit of Internationalization Award given in honor of her commitment to global service and outreach. Most recently the Genocide Intervention Network awarded her the Carl Wilken's Fellowship; an honor given to 20 people throughout the country dedicated to ending genocide.

A Few Good Women Recruiting Women to Government

HOME USE RIGHTS In 1969, the Nixon administration launched a little-known initiative to recruit women to government. President Nixon's then staff assistant, Barbara Franklin, led the effort. She talks about the project and the special collection of oral histories that document it. Barbara Franklin is President and Chief Executive Officer of Barbara Franklin Enterprises, a private investment and consulting firm headquartered in Washington, DC. Franklin served as the 29th U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. She has directed fourteen public companies and is currently a director of two. She received the prestigious John J. McCloy award in 1992 for her outstanding contributions to audit excellence. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

Race and Immigrationon Victor Romero

CLASSROOM USE Victor Romero, Philippines native, teaches and writes about immigrant and minority rights at Penn State. He joined the faculty in 1995 after working in private practice and as a law clerk to a federal judge in California. An elected member of the American Law Institute (ALI), Romero is co-editor of the anthology, Immigration and the Constitution, and author of Alienated: Immigrant Rights, the Constitution, and Equality in America. Romero has served as president of both the South Central Pennsylvania Chapter of the ACLU and the NAACP of the Greater Carlisle Area. He was also a visiting professor of law at Howard and at Rutgers-Camden. Most recently, Romero served as the associate dean for Academic Affairs at University Park during academic years 2006-07 and 2007-08. From the Conversations with Penn State Series featuring Patty Satalia

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